Officer Henry Wilson-Badge Numero Uno

Content for this blog provided by the city of Madison Police Department

“One of our K-9 Handlers, Officer Henry Wilson, holds badge #1.  The significance of this is great.  He was hired in 1984 and is now the most senior patrol officer at MPD.  It is an honor that very few officers will ever achieve.  No other officers will be assigned Badge #1 until Officer Wilson retires.  I have been privileged to have worked along side Officer Wilson many years ago.  He is a very well respected police officer and we at MPD our proud to have him in our ranks.  

Officer Wilson is currently a K-9 Handler with his partner Boris.  Officer Wilson had said this is his favorite assignment of all he has had here.  He recently brought Boris to interact with students at Toki Middle School and to talk about how he got into the policing profession.  Today, he received a beautiful photo of his presentation at the school that was signed by many of the kids who were present.  Officer Wilson was proudly displaying this in our break room at the West District and said his experience at the school was absolutely fantastic!  Hats off to Henry for his decades of dedicated service to the citizens of Madison!”

Officer Wilson, Capital K9s salutes you!

In Memory of K9 Greg

 

 

It is with great sadness that Capital K9s informs you that K9 Greg passed away on Saturday, December 16, 2016. Officer O’Shea previously informed Capital K9s of K9 Greg’s deteriorating health.

Police Officer Bart O’Shea and K9 Greg proudly served the citizens of Madison from 2005 to 2010. K9 Greg was one of the

Madison Police Department’s original K9s. He and K9 Johnny were the first two dogs purchased by Capital K9s. K9 Greg and K9 Johnny were sponsored by the generous donations of WJJO FM (Mid-West Family Broadcasting) and were named after the well- known morning disc jockey duo of Johnny Danger & Greg Bair.

In Officer O’Shea’s words: “K9 Greg had multiple apprehensions, with seven of those bite apprehensions. K9 Greg had a great personality, always ready to work, but equally willing to let 5-year- olds crawl all over him. His career highlights were the multiple apprehensions and alerting to 41 kilograms of cocaine in the attic of a search warrant target. It was a delight to be his handler and K9 Greg was definitely the smarter end of the leash”.

You can honor the memory of K9 Greg by donating to the Capital K9s Memorial Fund at: http://capitalk9s.org/get-involved/memorialfund/

K9 team vital in two investigations

Your financial support of Capital K9s makes this possible!

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The following was extracted from the Madison Police Department website:

“Officer Henry Wilson and K9 Boris had two significant calls for service recently that help demonstrate our police dog’s incredible capabilities. Officer Wilson and Boris tracked and located an armed robbery suspect and later located key evidence in another incident.

On November 21, 2016, a suspect committed an armed robbery with a handgun.  The suspect initially fled from the scene.  Officer Jim Donnell and K9 Krahnie responded to this first incident.  They tracked from the location of the robbery to a nearby parking lot.  K9 Krahnie indicated the track ended in the parking lot, a trained alert we refer to as a “vehicle pickup” meaning the scent ends and the suspect likely got into a car and left the area.  The investigation continued and led to a vehicle description the suspect used during the robbery.

Later that day, the suspect’s car was spotted.  Officers attempted to stop the vehicle which fled from officers once the stop was initiated.  A short vehicle pursuit ensued which ended with the suspect vehicle stopping and the suspect fleeing from his car.  Officer Wilson and K9 Boris were dispatched to track this suspect.  There are not many more dangerous situations for officers to undertake– such as tracking a known, armed suspect. 

Our K9s are trained to track a specific scent.  K9 officers can obtain the scent of the person we’re tracking through many means (clothing they’ve worn, objects they’ve touched, and so on).  In this case, Officer Wilson used the driver’s seat of the suspect’s car.  Once Boris was given the suspect’s scent, he immediately began tracking from the car across the street and up to a fence along the backyard of a residence.  It was later determined that the suspect jumped the fence at that location.  Officer Wilson and Boris worked around the fence and Boris began tracking the suspect again through some yards.  As they tracked past a house, Boris raised his head up (a behavior we oftentime see when the dogs are close to the subject they’re tracking) and began pulling Officer Wilson and his backup officers to the back of the residence.  It was dark outside and there was no illumination in the backyard.  Officer Wilson could see an elevated porch, but did not see the suspect.  Backup officers illuminated the area and could see a pile of leaves under the porch.  Moments later, the suspect’s hands emerged from under the pile of leaves as Boris was “announcing” his presence.  The suspect surrendered peacefully to officers on scene.  The dog located a suspect who was in a position to potentially ambush officers and likely played a significant role in the suspect surrendering without further violence.

On November 23, 2016, Officer Wilson and K9 Boris were dispatched to assist officers looking for evidence.  A suspect had crashed his vehicle and fled from the scene.  He was located by officers a short time later, smelled strongly of marijuana, but had nothing on his person. K9 Boris was summoned to sniff for marijuana (or any other contraband) that may have been discarded by the suspect as he fled from his car.  Boris sniffed the area, and likely path, the suspect took from his car to the point he was apprehended.  Inside the fenced yard the suspect found.  Boris began to work intently near an area where the backyard deck and fence line met.  Officer Wilson watched as Boris alerted (laid down) at that location.  Officer Wilson walked over to see what Boris had located.  He observed a plastic bag with several smaller baggies of, what turned out to be marijuana inside.  This evidence would likely not have been located without K9 Boris. 

Kudos to Officer Wilson and Boris for their outstanding work.  The team has been working together since March, 2012.  Boris is named after Boris Frank, who is a citizen that played an integral role in the establishment of Capital K9s (http://capitalk9s.org/ ), the non-profit that provides almost all of the financial support for the Madison Police Department’s K9 Unit.”

Capital K9s Establishes Memorial Fund

Officer Donnell and K9 Johnny

K9 Johnny was one of the originals. Hitting the streets in 2005 as a member of the Madison Police Department’s first-ever K9 Unit, he served a long and heroic career protecting the Capital City until his retirement in February 2015.  On July 1, 2016, he passed away at the age of 13.

This #GivingTuesday, November 29, Capital K9s launches a Memorial Fund to say “thank you” to K9 Johnny and all of Madison’s canine guardians who have reached their End of Watch. With funding through the Capital K9s Memorial Fund, our local heroes will be given an honorable burial with engraved headstone at Westport Pet Memorial in Waunakee, WI.

The average memorial for each K9 costs approximately $1,100. With ongoing financial support, Capital K9s will honor each of Madison’s police dogs for years to come. 

The Madison Police Department’s K9 Unit is currently comprised of nine working dogs. Their training, equipment, and veterinary care are provided by Capital K9s, which relies solely on donations to fund these initiatives. 

Be a part of the community that’s giving back to the loyal guardians who dedicated their lives to making our neighborhoods safer. Contribute to the Capital K9s Memorial Fund this #GivingTuesday, and tell your friends to do the same!

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Dog & Pony Show 2016

 

Indigo Trail Farms Fundraiser

Capital K9s and Madison Mounted sincerely thank Dr. Stacey Bean for graciously hosting a fundraising event at Indigo Trail Farms.  In addition, The Carlson Company, Soils & Engineering Services, Inc., David E. Zanger, Sous Chef UW Health, Karben4, and Becker505 made this event possible.  Those attending were amazed by the K9 and Mounted demos and informed of the resources needed to maintain these units of the Madison Police Department.  As Police Chief Michael Koval emphasized, funds raised at this event will benefit the community in a myriad of ways.  Here are photos memorializing this event.

 

 

 

K9 Jagger locates fleeing suspect

July 25, 2016 8:56 AM

On July 15th, at approximately 10:22 pm, Madison police officers attempted to stop a vehicle for a traffic violation.  The car was slow to pull over.  When it finally did stop the front seat passenger fled immediately from the traffic stop.  Officers immediately set up a perimeter around the area the suspect was seen fleeing.  Officer Eric Disch and K9 Jagger were summoned to track the fleeing subject.

Disch and Jagger Capital photo

Our police K9s are trained to scent discriminate.  They’re trained to track a specific person by their scent.  The dogs are presented an article that contains the scent we want them to track and they are trained to track that scent until it ends.  In this case, Officer Disch did not have a scent article to track the suspect, but we can “create” scent articles using sterile gauge and placing them on objects the subject touched.  In this instance, the front passenger seat where the person was sitting in prior to running was the perfect object.

Once prepared, the scent article was presented to Jagger and he immediately began tracking the suspect.  Jagger tracked along a sidewalk for a distance and then turned and began tracking up a grassy embankment with several trees and tall grass.  Officer Disch observed Jagger’s behavior change as they were closing in on the subject.  Based on this observation, Officer Disch gave a loud announcement letting anyone close to them(the suspect) know officers were there with a police K9.  Upon hearing the announcment, the suspect, who had been concealed along a fence line in 6-7 foot grass, stood up and was compliantly taken into custody without incident.

Why would a passenger run from a traffic stop?  In this case, the suspect had a felony warrant and two other charges pending from an unrelated incident.  This well-coordinated response by all of the officers involved led to this suspect being successfully located and arrested.

Remembering K9 Johnny


CapitalK9s-Johnny Alt Text

Sad news from this weekend, as former MPD K9 Johnny has passed away. Johnny was one of the original dogs with whom MPD started the K9 Unit in 2005, where he served for 10 very successful years. Because of what Johnny was able to accomplish, from finding drugs to tracking burglars to locating missing and endangered people, MPD has been able to grow its K9 Unit to eight handlers working with nine dogs today. We thank K9 Johnny for everything he did for the department, and will keep his human family in our thoughts and prayers.Jim_Krahnie_BoatJim_Krahnie 2014 (640x427)Resized

 

 

 

 

 

K9 Frees Locates Evidence

The following is extracted verbatim from the Madison Police Department blotter:

June 21, 2016 8:32 AM

Last evening, Officer Nick Eull and K9 Frees were dispatched to assist with a weapons offense investigation. What had started out with two juveniles physically fighting in a nearby park escalated into a stabbing. After the initial fight was over, the juveniles involved returned to the 6700 block of Schroeder Road to continue the fight. During this altercation, the suspect stabbed the victim once in the back. The victim was transported to the hospital for treatment of his non-life-threatening injuries.

Nick_Eull_with_FreesThe suspect was arrested on scene without the weapon used in the attack. Officers on scene were able to determine an area that the weapon was likely discarded by the suspect. Officer Eull and K9 Frees were called to attempt to locate this key piece of evidence.

Our patrol K9s are trained to locate evidence. They do this by sniffing an area for an object or objects that contain human odor. In K9 Frees case, the weapon had been tossed into a large, thick, heavily vegetated area. As dusk was falling, Officer Eull had K9 Frees begin sniffing the area in question. They began on the downwind side of the area, as this helps carry scent to the dog. In short order, Officer Eull recognized K9 Frees change of behavior as Frees began working a scent cone created by the object. K9 Frees worked to the source of this scent, alerting on the weapon used in this violent attack. K9 Frees was able to locate this weapon, which was also laying under some vegetation, in about three minutes.

Great work by this team and another example of how our K9 partners compliment the work we do every day.

Officer Jason Baumgart & K9 Allied Graduate

From the MPD Blotter: Newest K9, Allied, already having an impact

June 3, 2016 9:50 AM

Officer Jason Baumgart and his K9 partner, Allied, just recently graduated from their 6 week handlers course and another week of in-house training before “hitting the streets.” The team has already had a couple of noteworthy cases in less than two weeks of working in patrol.

The team was utilized for two separate cases of suspected drug trafficking. The first case required K9 Allied to sniff a vehicle. K9 Allied alerted on the vehicle where illegal drugs were recovered. A search warrant for the suspect’s apartment was also executed. K9 Allied was utilized to sniff the apartment where additional illegal drugs were located. In all, heroin, cocaine, marijuana, and cash were seized during this investigation.

Less than a week later, Officer Baumgart and K9 Allied were called to another traffic stop. K9 Allied sniffed the exterior of the vehicle, alerting to the odor of illegal drugs in the van. This sniff allowed a subsequent sniff and search of the vehicle’s interior where a kilo of cocaine was located hidden in a container.

Officer Baumgart and K9 Allied’s impact are already being felt.

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